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 ANSWER
Position: We believe they do have close friends.

Reasoning:  It appears in the test below that 'cattle were receiving social support from their preferred partners allowing them to have a reduced stress response to the social isolation test.' This study was carried out by: http://nectar.northampton.ac.uk/6466/1/McLennan20136466.pdf Method In order to assess the strength of these positive relationships between dyads and to investigate the importance of these relationships to cattle, a short term (30 minutes) separation test from the remainder of the herd was carried out. Cattle’s responses to the challenge were assessed both physiologically and behaviourally. Observation and reflection: A significantly lower heart rate (p<0.01) during the separation period was observed when cattle were separated with their preferred partner compared to the non-preferred partner, and significantly lower levels of behaviour suggestive of agitation (p<0.05) were observed when they were with their preferred partner compared to when they were with the nonpreferred partner. These results suggest that cattle were receiving social support from their preferred partners allowing them to have a reduced stress response to the social isolation test.

Updated 20/03/2017 at 04:36

 QUESTION

Do cattle have best friends ; Will keeping them together as social groups be good for them?

A question designed to find out what people believe and to get some evidence to back it up.

Answers:
Do cattle have best friends? 
Updated 02/05/2017 at 03:49

REPORT